The Pursuit of Happyness 1/10/2008 22:51
感动

There is no “Y” in happiness, there is “I”.
Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom.
You can if you think you can.
Sorry for my dumbness, I didn't understand about thees "Y"/"I" and wisdom. Can you explain it? oops

QR :
感动

There is no “Y” in happiness, there is “I”.
Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom.
You can if you think you can.
pompano at 1/10/2008 22:57 快速引用
pompano :
Sorry for my dumbness, I didn't understand about thees "Y"/"I" and wisdom. Can you explain it? oops

QR :
感动

There is no “Y” in happiness, there is “I”.
Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom.
You can if you think you can.


没有丫,只有爱。 Laughing happy
WoJian at 1/10/2008 23:01 快速引用
If I could rearrange the alphabet, I'd put U and I together.
Gemini at 1/10/2008 23:05 快速引用
Gemini :
If I could rearrange the alphabet, I'd put U and I together.


UI在有些人看来就是在一起的一件工作。
rogerlee at 1/10/2008 23:19 快速引用
You get it after watching this movie smile

pompano :
Sorry for my dumbness, I didn't understand about thees "Y"/"I" and wisdom. Can you explain it? oops

QR :
感动

There is no “Y” in happiness, there is “I”.
Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom.
You can if you think you can.
QR at 1/10/2008 23:23 快速引用
There is no U 啊。

Gemini :
If I could rearrange the alphabet, I'd put U and I together.
QR at 1/10/2008 23:26 快速引用
你有这部片子吗?

QR :
You get it after watching this movie smile
rogerlee at 1/10/2008 23:48 快速引用
borrowed it from the library, due tomorrow Sad

rogerlee :
你有这部片子吗?

QR :
You get it after watching this movie smile
QR at 1/11/2008 00:04 快速引用
QR :
borrowed it from the library, due tomorrow Sad

rogerlee :
你有这部片子吗?

QR :
You get it after watching this movie smile


感动 感动 感动
About happiness, read
Happier: Learn the Secrets to Daily Joy and Lasting Fulfillment (Hardcover)
by Tal Ben-Shahar (Author)
flyingmonkey at 1/11/2008 14:35 快速引用
QR :
borrowed it from the library, due tomorrow Sad

rogerlee :
你有这部片子吗?

QR :
You get it after watching this movie smile


support support support
Here is what a friend wrote about how to becoming happier:

Some of you might recall that a couple of months ago I gave a speech on the happiest place in the world. In a social study, Denmark was ranked the happiest nation in the world; the united state was ranked #23, UK #41. We know above a certain modest income level, being better off has little effect on mood. In the US, since nineteen sixties, the Dow Jones Industry Average has risen 20 times higher, but according to a research study, the number of people with depression has increased 10 times and the average age of depression onset decreased from 30 to age 15.

The UK politician David Cameron said that "we have to remember what makes people happy, as well as what makes stock market rise." The purely economic measure of gross domestic product, should be complemented by a concept of "general well being" - some called it Gross National Happiness. A lot can be discussed on what government should do to raise a nation's happiness level but is not the focus of my talk today as I'll talk about what individuals can do to make ourselves happy.

It's just human nature that we all want to be happy or happier. Thomas Jefferson wrote among our unalienable rights are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That pursuit has led many of us on a wild goose chase, and to some it may not lead to happiness. A lot of research has been done to investigate the causes of depression or anxiety. But understanding causes of happiness may be more useful.

Tal Ben-Shahar teaches a course in happiness at Harvard. His course has become Harvard's most popular, with 855 students enrolled, unseating Introductory Economics, the class that has held that distinction for years.

Is Ben-Shahar going to share some secret piece of wisdom, the one true key to happiness, but inevitably - as in all those guru-on-a-mountaintop jokes - there isn't one. Insisting that there ought to be one true path to anything is precisely the problem, he tells his class.

What is actually important for sustained happiness is the internal, our perception of the world. For instance, how do we look at failure? Do we see it as a stumbling block or do we see it as a stepping stone?

It helps to ask three simple questions.

What do you find meaning in?
What are you good at?
And what do you find pleasure in?

Pay attention to the order of those three questions. Many people do something that has yes answers on the first two questions, but it leads to ultimate unhappiness. For example,

Ben-Shahar himself was Israeli national squash champion at age 17. He was extremely good at squash, and he considered it an extremely meaningful pursuit, the two factors most of us think of as defining a life of fulfillment. Yet he wasn't remotely happy. He felt emptiness when he won the champion.

He's telling us that it's not a bad thing to try to do what makes us happy because ultimately it will benefit ourselves and everyone around us.

Graduating from Harvard all the way from bachelor to Ph.D with honors, he removed himself with a tenure track career path, instead focus on something he enjoys doing: being an instructor and teaching happiness.
When he first started, he only had 8 students and 2 of them quit in the middle. But now the classroom is packed with hundreds of students and their families.

I'd like to share two tips for happiness from Ben-Shahar.

1. Feel your pain. We're all under a lot of pressure to be happy ― but we need to allow ourselves to feel pain and sadness, too. "Paradoxically, when you allow yourself to feel negative emotions, you're likely to be happier in the long run," he says.
Give yourself permission to be human. When we accept emotions ― such as fear, sadness, or anxiety ― as natural, we are more likely to overcome them. Rejecting our emotions, positive or negative, leads to frustration and unhappiness.

2. Accept life as a roller coaster. a happy life will have the usual difficulties or challenges, and trying to avoid those, or hoping not to experience those, inevitably leads to unhappiness and frustration.
Optimistic people have ups and downs like everyone else, Ben-Shahar says. "The difference is that happy people realize that if they're sad, they'll get over it," he says. "There's a misconception that being happy means being on a high and having positive moods all the time. That's not what happiness is. If you're happy, you have a life ― overall ― that you find both meaningful and pleasurable."

He also offers a lot of other tips, for example, focusing on what you have, not what you don't have, working out, being grateful and keeping a gratitude journal.

Most importantly ask these three questions in this order:

What do you find meaning in?
what do you find pleasure in?
And what are you good at?

Try to do what makes us happy and is meaningful because ultimately it will benefit ourselves and everyone around us.
flyingmonkey at 1/11/2008 14:39 快速引用
flyingmonkey :

1. Feel your pain. We're all under a lot of pressure to be happy ― but we need to allow ourselves to feel pain and sadness, too. "Paradoxically, when you allow yourself to feel negative emotions, you're likely to be happier in the long run," he says.
Give yourself permission to be human. When we accept emotions ― such as fear, sadness, or anxiety ― as natural, we are more likely to overcome them. Rejecting our emotions, positive or negative, leads to frustration and unhappiness.


同意 support
emory at 1/11/2008 14:56 快速引用
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